Sitting anywhere / City’s everywhere

by diego terna

text published on C3 Magazine, n.326

versione italiana

Sitting anywhere

I once had a girl, or should I say, she once had me.

She showed me her room, isn’t it good, norwegian wood?

She asked me to stay and she told me to sit anywhere,

So I looked around and I noticed there wasn’t a chair.

I sat on a rug, biding my time, drinking her wine.

We talked until two and then she said, “it’s time for bed.”

She told me she worked in the morning and started to laugh.

I told her I didn’t and crawled off to sleep in the bath.

And when I awoke I was alone, this bird had flown.

So I lit a fire, isn’t it good, norwegian wood.

The Beatles, Norwegian Wood (This Bird Has Flown), Rubber Soul, 1965

As in the preparation of the most famous triptych of masterpieces to be released between 1967 and 1969 (Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Heart’s Club Band, White Album, and Abbey Road), The Beatles complete the liberation from commercial pop, began with  the album Help a few months before, through the album Rubber Soul. Within this one, John Lennon composed a mysterious song, Norwegian Wood, whose meaning evaporates in a series of possibilities that range from the sweetness of an evening with friends to the anguish of a closing in which everything seems to end with a vindictive fire.

Between the folds of an inexact sense, the space of the tale also is ambiguous: the phrases she told me to sit anywhere / So I looked around and I noticed there wasn’t a chair / I sat on a rug, biding my time/ I told her I didn’t and crawled off to sleep in the bath, talk to us of a place in which the basic functions – sitting, sleeping – may occur anywhere within the same place, as if the flow of the story could not be blocked by a simple request for placement and, indeed, as one loses the references of a formalized use of space, enclosed within specific areas.

Where do you sit? It does not matter, just sit. Where do you sleep? It does not matter, just sleep.

Each person can build an area where one conducts the required activity; the space must simply set itself up as a receptive and adaptable belly, perhaps difficult to live in, at first sight, because it requires a rethinking of one own functional behaviours, but is open to a continuous individual design.

It is not a coincidence then that this song has given title to one of the most successful books of the last two decades in Japan (and worldwide): Noruwei no mori, written by Haruki Murakami and published in 1987, from which was made a movie in 2010, directed by Anh Hung Tran.

A scene from the movie, apparently secondary but very intense, shows the protagonist, Toru Watanabe, intent on doing laundry, in a room of the university hostel in which he lives. He is dressed only in boxer shorts and undershirt and runs, after receiving the letter of his girlfriend Naoko, to his bedroom. The camera follows him until the big, anonymous scale, and then swirls in the spiral flight. Suddenly appear drying laundry, clothes hanging on wires, a tangle of strings between the different stories that animate the space, with a brutal and messy vitality.

The brief appearance of this place can tell us, recalling the words of the song by Lennon, a first key feature of Japanese residential architecture: the attempt to harmonize internal and external in a single landscape, in a mixture of private and public functions that build new urbanities in the interiors and vice versa. The scene of the Japanese film is peculiar because it is away from the vernacular image of clothes hanging in historic cities (Venice, for example). Here, the external use of the city is brought in and, far from any form of degradation, Toru Watanabe is moving in the hostel as if he was in the hallway of his home, despite being in a public place, moving seamlessly from laundry room to bedroom, like walking in an urban area, where one can, as sung by the Beatles, sit where one wants, sleep where one wants.

It is what happens in the Rolex Learning Centre in Lausanne, where the SANAA office offers an example of fluid space, where the interior is built as an outdoor landscape, a topography that returns a fictional territory enclosed by borders, but ambiguously open to what is outside, or better, as if it had absorbed the outside in the inside. Here, again, there are no precise functional purposes, but rather some hierarchical rules, which indicate the privacy of some areas more than others, but the whole is immersed in a liquid solution, where one can move with fluidity, where one can organize his individual space, lying, sitting, walking.

And, again, by a project of SANAA, it happens, but on a larger scale, in the Inujima Art House, where a series of small buildings construct an urban museum’s path, which completely invests the small town. It no longer makes sense, then, talk about cities like a dichotomy between public and private space, between the interior and exterior, residential function (or museum) and urban area.

City’s everywhere

It is an ancient and sophisticated legacy that elevates the human behaviour (and therefore also the design and use of space) on top of daily events, what one reads in the novel The Old Capital, written by Yasuri Kawabata in 1968. Here the subject around which the story develops is linked to the encounter between two girls who discover they are twins but had lived until the age of majority in two different families and have grown up without either knowing of the other. The meeting, dramatic and burdened by the presence of the fiancé of one of the girls, takes place through the pages of the book as if it were secondary, as if the inner impulses of the protagonists were dissolved in a more courtly vision of life. The cherry blossoms are the important event, the cedars of Kitayama, the drawing of an Obi, planned to tie around a kimono.

Chieko discovered the violets flowering on the trunk of the old maple tree. “Ah. They’ve bloomed again this year” […]

The maple was rather large for such a small garden in the city; the trunk was larger around than Chieko’s waist. But this ancient tree with its coarse moss-covered bark was not the sort of thing one should compare with a girl’s innocent body. […]

Just below the large bend were two hollow places with violets growing in each. Every spring they would put forth flowers. The two violets had been there on the tree ever since Chieko could remember. […]

Though customers who came to the shop admired the splendid maple, few noticed the violets blooming on it. […]

But the butterflies knew them. The moment Chieko noticed the violets, several small white butterflies fluttered through the garden from the trunk near the flowers. The whiteness of their dance shone against the maple, which was just beginning to open its own small red buds.

The flowers and leaves of the two violets cast a faint shadow on the new green of the moss on the maple trunk.

The dramatic events of the novel suffer under these details, as if the overall conduct of the events was subject to the peaceful vision of detailed portions of the same events: it is not the maple-tree – admired by the community – to make sense of the vision or, better, it is not only that, but the two small violets, just flowered, recognized only by the protagonist and a small swarm of butterflies.

In this sense, the projects presented here, and much Japanese architecture in general, seem to build themselves as precise juxtapositions of punctual elements that transform the same architectures in amounts of episodic spaces, visions and uses.

It is not simply a functional list made readable in the forms, but rather the reconstruction of an interior landscape that is implemented with some complexity similar to what can be found in the city: the connections between the rooms, the relationship between inside and outside, the incoming of air and light, the intrusion of nature in the internal ambience, expanding the possible readings of the spaces. As in the passage of Kawabata, therefore, the full understanding of an episode – of an architecture – can be read through different levels, through the totality of the general form to its subdivision into a sum of poetic visions.

The second feature legible in the residential projects presented here, therefore, talks to us of a complexity of spaces that add up with one another to build an unfinished tale which transforms itself according to the user, the manner of appropriation and the use of spaces; the architecture, in this sense, is defined as open and unfinished, which suggests the possibility of change, of evolution, as in a city.

The flexibility of the space, as the first feature, leads to the complexity of forms; the second feature, with naturalness: each of the presented architectures is constructed as a small area of cities, like an urban passage slightly bordered by a private property, but that flows continuously from the inside  to the outside.

 A House Made of Two by Naf Architect

Machi-building by UID Architects

 Secret garden by Ryuichi Ashizawa

AMA House by Katsutoshi Sasaki

Roof on the hill by Alphaville

Fourth-Generation Houses

In this sense, the houses anayized below seem to describe themselves as “Fourth-Generation Houses” in the words of Yoshiharu Tsukamoto, founder of Atelier Bow-Wow, on the book Behaviorology, published in 2010:

The form of the building is situated to share an ecological relationship with the diverse behaviours of different element. […] The building allows the elements to behave optimally, and consistent with their very nature.

[…] We raise three important conditions for the fourth-generation house: that interior spaces be inviting for those who are not member of the family; that quasi-exterior spaces be introduced in a positive manner, coaxing inhabitants out of their homes; and that the gap spaces between neighbouring building be redefined.

The key to understanding the projects therefore lies in those areas not strictly residential, in the service spaces, which connect the functions of living through open and flexible systems, which draw their inspiration from the human behavior in urban areas. The houses, then, become small towns, where one can build habits and ways of free living, that fit every single individualism and become a sort of propaedeutic gym to what happens outside, in the public city, which now shows itself, clearly, as an extension of the private to the outside.



versione italiana

Sitting anywhere / City’s everywhere

Sitting anywhere

I once had a girl, or should I say, she once had me.

She showed me her room, isn’t it good, norwegian wood?

She asked me to stay and she told me to sit anywhere,

So i looked around and I noticed there wasn’t a chair.

I sat on a rug, biding my time, drinking her wine.

We talked until two and then she said, “it’s time for bed”.

She told me she worked in the morning and started to laugh.

I told her I didn’t and crawled off to sleep in the bath.

And when I awoke I was alone, this bird had flown.

So I lit a fire, isn’t it good, norwegian wood.

The Beatles, Norwegian Wood (This Bird Has Flown), Rubber Soul, 1965

Come in preparazione del trittico più famoso di capolavori che vedranno la luce tra il 1967 e il 1969 (Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Heart’s Club Band, White Album e Abbey Road), i Beatles completano l’affrancamento da un pop di matrice commerciale, iniziato con l’album Help qualche mese prima, attraverso l’album Rubber Soul. All’interno di questo John Lennon compone una canzone misteriosa, Norwegian Wood, il cui senso evapora in una serie di possibilità che variano tra la dolcezza di una serata tra amici e l’angoscia di un finale in cui tutto pare chiudersi con un incendio venticativo.

Tra le pieghe di un senso inesatto anche lo spazio del racconto risulta ambiguo: le frasi she told me to sit anywhere / So I looked around and I noticed there wasn’t a chair / I sat on a rug, biding my time/ I told her i didn’t and crawled off to sleep in the bath, ci parlano di un luogo nel quale le funzioni basiche – sedersi, dormire – possono avvenire ovunque all’interno dello stesso, come se il flusso della storia non potesse essere bloccato da una semplice richiesta di posizionamento.

Dove ci si siede? Non importa, basta sedersi. Dove si dorme? Non importa, basta dormire.

Ogni persona può costruirsi un ambito nel quale svolgere l’attività richiesta; lo spazio deve semplicemente costituirsi come un ventre ricettivo ed adattabile, difficoltoso da vivere, a prima vista, perché richiede un ripensamento delle proprie abitudini funzionali, ma aperto ad una continua progettazione individuale.

Non è un caso dunque che questa canzone abbia dato il titolo ad uno dei libri di maggior successo dell’ultimo ventennio in Giappone (e nel mondo): Noruwei no mori, scritto da Haruki Murakami e pubblicato nel 1987, dal quale è stato tratto un film nel 2010, diretto da Anh Hung Tran.

Una scena del film, apparentemente secondaria, ma assolutamente intensa, mostra il protagonista, Toru Watanabe, intento a fare il bucato, in un locale del pensionato universitario nel quale vive. E’ vestito solo con un paio di boxer e una canottiera e corre, dopo aver ricevuto la lettera della fidanzata Naoko, verso la sua stanza. La camera da presa lo segue fino ad arrivare alla grande, anonima, scala, per poi ruotare vorticosamente nella spirale delle rampe. Ed improvvisamente appaiono panni stesi, vestiti appesi a cavi, un intreccio di fili tra piano e piano che animano lo spazio, con una vitalità brutale e disordinata.

La brevissima apparizione di questo luogo ci riesce a raccontare, ricordando le parole della canzone di Lennon, una prima caratteristica fondamentale dell’architettura residenziale giapponese: il tentativo di armonizzare interno ed esterno in un unico paesaggio, in una commistione di funzioni private e pubbliche che costruiscono delle nuove urbanità all’interno degli spazi interni e viceversa. La scena del film giapponese è singolare perché lontana dall’immagine vernacolare dei panni stesi nelle città storiche (a Venezia, per esempio). Qui l’uso esterno della città è portato all’interno e, lungi da una qualsiasi forma di degrado, Toru Watanabe si muove nel pensionato come se fosse nel corridoio della propria casa, pur essendo in un luogo pubblico, passando senza soluzioni di continuità dalla lavanderia alla stanza, come passeggiando in uno spazio urbano, nel quale è possibile, come cantato dai Beatles, sedersi dove si vuole, dormire dove si vuole.

E’ quello che succede nel Rolex Learning Center di Losanna, nel quale lo studio SANAA propone un esempio di spazio fluido, dove l’interno è costruito come un paesaggio esterno, una topografia fittizia che restituisce un territorio racchiuso entro dei confini, ma ambiguamente aperto a ciò che sta fuori o, meglio, come se avesse assorbito il fuori all’interno. Qui, ancora, non esistono delle precise destinazioni funzionali, ma bensì delle gerarchie di massima, che indicano la privatezza di alcuni spazi rispetto ad altri, ma il tutto è immerso in una soluzione liquida, dove potersi muovere con fluidità, dove poter organizzare il proprio spazio individualmente, sdraiandosi, sedendosi, camminando.

E, ancora su progetto dello studio SANAA, così avviene, ma su una scala più grande, nell’Inujima Art House, dove una serie di piccoli edifici costruiscono un percorso museale urbano, che investe totalmente il piccolo paese. Non ha più senso, dunque, parlare di città come dicotomia tra spazio pubblico e spazio privato, tra interno ed esterno, tra funzione residenziale (o museale) ed ambito urbano.

City’s everywhere

E’ un lascito antico e raffinato, che eleva il comportamento umano (e dunque anche la progettazione e l’uso degli spazi) al di sopra degli avvenimenti quotidiani, quello che si legge nel racconto Koto, scritto da Yasuri Kawabata nel 1968: qui il motivo principale attorno al quale si sviluppa la storia è legato all’incontro fra due ragazze, che scoprono di essere gemelle ma di aver vissuto fino alla maggiore età in due famiglie diverse, che le hanno cresciute ad insaputa l’una del’altra. L’incontro, drammatico e appesantito dalla presenza del promesso sposo di una delle ragazze, si svolge lungo le pagine del libro come se fosse secondario, come se i moti interiori delle protagoniste si stemperassero in una visione più aulica della vita. E’ la fioritura dei ciliegi l’avvenimento importante, i cedri del Kitayama, il disegno di un Obi da legare attorno ad un kimono.

Chieko scoprì le violette fiorite sul tronco antico dell’acero.

“Sono fiorite anche quest’anno.”

[…] Nel piccolo giardino di città, quell’acero era davvero grande, più grande dei fianchi di Chieko. La sua corteccia vecchia, rugosa, cosparsa di muschio, non era tuttavia da paragonare al corpo giovane e fresco di lei.

[…] Poco sotto in cui più ampiamente piegava sulla destra, si intravedevano due piccole cavità: da queste spuntavano, distanti, due violette.

[…]I clienti che si recavano nella bottega esprimevano la loro ammirazione per l’acero, tuttavia quasi nessuno notava le violette fiorite.

[…] Ma le farfalle le conoscevano. Quando Chieko le aveva scoperte fiorite, un piccolo sciame bianco, librandosi basso nel giardino,volò dal tronco dell’acero fino a esse. Sul rosso delicato delle piccole gemme che stavano per schiudersi, quel bianco volo di farfalle era vivido e pieno di grazia. Sul verde fresco del muschio dell’acero, le foglie e i fiori delle due piante di violette gettavano un’ombra assai tenue.

Gli avvenimenti drammatici del racconto passano in secondo piano rispetto a questi dettagli, come se lo svolgimento generale delle vicende fosse subordinato alla quieta visione di porzioni dettagliate delle vicende stesse: non è il tronco dell’acero –ammirato dalla comunità- a dare un senso alla visione, ma bensì le due piccole violette, appena fiorite, riconosciute solo dalla protagonista e da un leggero sciame di farfalle.

In questo senso i progetti qui presentati, e molte architetture giapponesi in generale, risentono, positivamente, di una mancanza di visione generale della forma: è come se si costruissero come somma di dettagli, come somma di visioni parziali. La seconda caratteristica degli spazi residenziali giapponesi risiede, appunto, nel loro affrancarsi da una ricerca di forme che spicchino nel costruito come individualità, rispetto al territorio circostante. L’architettura si definisce come un non finito aperto, che lascia intravedere possibilità di modifica, di evoluzione.

La forma architettonica dunque è subordinata ad una sorta di elenco di funzioni aggregate in base a “particolari” ritenuti di maggiore importanza: le connessioni tra le stanze, il rapporto tra interno ed esterno, l’ingresso dell’aria e della luce, l’intrudersi della natura negli spazi interni.

La flessibilità dello spazio, come prima caratteristica, sfocia nella mancanza di forma, seconda caratteristica, con naturalità: ognuna delle architetture presentate si costruisce come un piccolo ambito di città, come un brano urbano leggermente delimitato entro una proprietà privata, ma che fluisce dal dentro al fuori con continuità.

Case di quarta generazione

In questo senso le residenze analizzate di seguito paiono descriversi come “Case di quarta generazione” attraverso le parole di Yoshiharu Tsukamoto, fondatore di Atelier Bow-Wow, presenti sul libro Behaviorology, pubblicato nel 2010:

The form of the building is situated to share an ecological relationship with the diverse behaviors of different element. […] The building allows the elements to behave optimally, and consistent with their very nature.

[…] We raise three important conditions for the fourth-generation house: that interior spaces be inviting for those who are not member of the family; that quasi-exterior spaces be introduced in a positive manner, coaxing inhabitants out of their homes; and that the gap spaces between neighbouring building be redefined.

 

La chiave di lettura dei progetti risiede dunque negli ambiti non strettamente residenziali, negli spazi di servizio, che connettono le funzioni proprie dell’abitare attraverso sistemi aperti e flessibili, che traggono la propria ispirazione dai comportamenti umani in ambito urbano. Le case, allora, diventano piccole città, nelle quali è possibile costruire usi e modi di abitare liberi, che si adattano ad ogni singola individualità e che diventano una sorta di palestra propedeutica a quello che avviene fuori, nella città pubblica, che ora si mostra, chiaramente, come estensione del privato verso l’esterno.




Advertisements